Coming up on Friday, July 12, and boy are we excited, come see Silencio-A Tribute to the Works of David Lynch & Angelo Badalamenti and locals Weird Hot perform sets of covers of songs from Lynch films plus Lynch-themed art, burlesque, comedy, and more!

Public · By PhilaMOCA
    Friday, July 12, 2013
    6:00pm until 11:30pm

PhilaMOCA are proud to formally announce our second annual celebration of the Eraserhood with ERASERHOOD FOREVER (AND EVER). The event will be held on Friday, July 12, 2013 and will be comprised of a David Lynch-themed art show followed by Lynch-themed entertainment featuring:

SILENCIO : Pittsburgh-based orchestral ensemble who deliberately evoke the mood and sound of the films of David Lynch. Haunting and beautiful, Badalamenti would be proud.

WEIRD HOT : Philly-based six-piece party band known for their garish grooves, happening harmonies, and creative covers. Always the strangest and most stylish weirdos at the party.
Fun fact: Weird Hot frontman Shawn Kilroy is credited with bringing the Lynch/Callowhill connection to the masses with his short film ERASERHEAD NEIGHBORHOOD.

Lynch-themed burlesque courtesy of MISS ROSE and friends.

The World Premiere screening of the PhilaMOCA-created short film, ERASERHOOD FOREVER, a portrait of the rapidly evolving neighborhood.

And returning host, BEN VELVET.

Art Show from 6:00-8:00 PM, entertainment from 8:00-11:30 PM.
Official after-party will be held at THE TRESTLE INN (339 N. 11th Street) and will feature Eraserhood-themed drinks.

$10, All Ages.

There is currently a Call for Lynch-themed Art:

2012 Eraserhood Forever coverage:
Around Philly:

City Paper:

The Deli:



The Key:



Philadelphia Weekly:


About PhilaMOCA:
The Philadelphia Mausoleum of Contemporary Art is a former showroom for caskets and mausoleums turned multi-purpose art space that specializes in film and live music. PhilaMOCA is located at 531 N. 12th Street and is considered by many to be the “center of weird in Philadelphia.” WXPN’s The Key recently referred to PhilaMOCA as “ground zero for the arts in Philadelphia.”