Walking the Eraserhood: 524 North 12th Street

Via Flickr:
“Walking the Eraserhood” represents an ongoing street-level exploration of the Callowhill district and surrounding environs, a sort of virtual walking tour of the neighborhood.

The amazing relic of Finney & Son Monuments/Mausoleum, on the east side of 12th Streetx now houses the Philadelphia Mausoleum of Contemporary Art (PhilaMOCA), an arts organization and performance venue famous for promoting the Eraserhood as a creepy yet inspirational neighborhood.

Copyright © 2009-2013, Bob Bruhin. All rights reserved.

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Walking the Eraserhood: 1121 Spring Garden Street

Via Flickr:
“Walking the Eraserhood” represents an ongoing street-level exploration of the Callowhill district and surrounding environs, a sort of virtual walking tour of the neighborhood.

With luck, the twin spires of the endangered Church of the Assumption are still here on the north side of the street. Tradition holds this is also the site over which Franklin’s kite flew during his famous electrical experiment. Just west of Assumption is a rectory, built in a radically different style.

Copyright © 2009-2013, Bob Bruhin. All rights reserved.


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Walking the Eraserhood: 1026 Spring Garden Street

Via Flickr:
“Walking the Eraserhood” represents an ongoing street-level exploration of the Callowhill district and surrounding environs, a sort of virtual walking tour of the neighborhood.

The 1889 Spring Garden Farmers Market occupies the south side of the street, here. The market has been closed for decades, but the building has been kept in relatively good repair by a series of other businesses. Currently it is occupied by a music venue known as Union Transfer.

Copyright © 2009-2013, Bob Bruhin. All rights reserved.


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Walking the Eraserhood: 11th and Green Streets

“Walking the Eraserhood” represents an ongoing street-level exploration of the Callowhill district and surrounding environs, a sort of virtual walking tour of the neighborhood.

See the small row of homes on the southeast corner, tucked in to the fold of the former Independence Press building.

Copyright © 2009-2013, Bob Bruhin. All rights reserved.


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Walking the Eraserhood: 9th and Green Streets

“Walking the Eraserhood” represents an ongoing street-level exploration of the Callowhill district and surrounding environs, a sort of virtual walking tour of the neighborhood.

Here you can look north to see the last block of the abandoned portion of the Reading Viaduct west of you, and the bed of the current SEPTA rails to the east as they leave the Commuter Tunnel and rejoin the still active portion of the former Reading line.

Copyright © 2009-2013, Bob Bruhin. All rights reserved.


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Walking the Eraserhood: 9th and Spring Garden Streets

“Walking the Eraserhood” represents an ongoing street-level exploration of the Callowhill district and surrounding environs, a sort of virtual walking tour of the neighborhood.

The Viaduct crosses Spring Garden Street to the west of this intersection, on an uncharacteristic concrete bridge. The northwest corner of the intersection is dominated by former Spring Garden Station, closed when the Viaduct was abandoned in favor of the new underground Commuter Tunnel.

Copyright © 2009-2013, Bob Bruhin. All rights reserved.


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Walking the Eraserhood: 9th and Buttonwood Streets

“Walking the Eraserhood” represents an ongoing street-level exploration of the Callowhill district and surrounding environs, a sort of virtual walking tour of the neighborhood.

Looking west (because we are on the edge of the Eraserhood district, east of here much of the historical structures were demolished during a poorly planned urban renewal phase) we get another good look at the Viaduct, as well as a side view of the Haverford Bicycle Company, including a ghost sign bearing the legend, “The bicycle with the national reputation.”

Copyright © 2009-2013, Bob Bruhin. All rights reserved.


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Walking the Eraserhood: 9th and Willow Streets

“Walking the Eraserhood” represents an ongoing street-level exploration of the Callowhill district and surrounding environs, a sort of virtual walking tour of the neighborhood.

The majestic bulk of the 1927 Willow Street Steam Generation Plant dominates this corner. Originally built by Philadelphia Electric Company, Willow Steam was once part of the third largest steam heating system in the United States. This is another one of the sites that David Lynch appears to allude to in the first ten minutes of Eraserhead. From here, one can look west to see another view of the various ages and styles of architecture that compose Esslinger’s site.

Copyright © 2009-2013, Bob Bruhin. All rights reserved.


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Walking the Eraserhood: 905 Callowhill Street

“Walking the Eraserhood” represents an ongoing street-level exploration of the Callowhill district and surrounding environs, a sort of virtual walking tour of the neighborhood.

On days when the gate is open here, behind George Esslinger’s brewery, one can still see what appear to be empty brew tanks lying on their sides in the yard.

Copyright © 2009-2013, Bob Bruhin. All rights reserved.

Walking the Eraserhood: 10th and Callowhill Streets


“Walking the Eraserhood” represents an ongoing street-level exploration of the Callowhill district and surrounding environs, a sort of virtual walking tour of the neighborhood.

Looking northwest along Ridge Avenue provides an excellent view of the Viaduct as it switches back and forth between iron and stone supports. The now empty triangle to the north, between Ridge and 10th is traditionally held to be the spot where Benjamin Franklin engaged a blacksmith to affix an iron point on his kite, prior to his famous experiment, supposedly also performed on this site. (The kite, itself, is held to have been flying over a spot several blocks away, where Assumption Church was later built.) On the northeast corner, one can see the former bottling line of George Esslinger’s brewery, as well as the taller, older brew house behind it. Here is an excellent example of an industrial site evolving in a specific location over the years. You can look at the various structures piled together and, if you have the experience, estimate the age of each. On the southwest corner is the former site of the site of the Philadelphia Circus and Menagerie, later rebuilt in 1874 as the New National Theater. Supposedly, with some modifications, the building currently on the site is the same building that once housed the theater.

Copyright © 2009-2013, Bob Bruhin. All rights reserved.

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