An Addition Gets an Addition on 13th Street – OCF Realty

As we’ve said who knows how many times before, surface parking lots are the worst. To their credit, the owners of this property are of the same mind, and they’re eliminating the surface lot, in a manner of speaking. That’s the construction that we noticed the other day, a structure that’s currently framed up to four stories. The building is technically an addition to the existing twelve-unit building, and it will include six more apartments. The parking is sticking around on the ground floor, and we’re not sure that whether this will be interior parking or the parking area will remain open to the elements.

Read more: An Addition Gets an Addition on 13th Street – OCF Realty

New renderings of Met Philadelphia show the 110-year-old opera house reimagined | PhillyVoice

A rendering of the renovated Philadelphia Metropolitan Opera House. / AOS ARCHITECTS /FOR PHILLYVOICE

The Philadelphia Metropolitan Opera House, which has stood vacant on North Broad Street for decades, is reopening this December as a Live Nation venue. Today we finally have an idea of what it will look like inside.

Source: New renderings of Met Philadelphia show the 110-year-old opera house reimagined | PhillyVoice

The past, present, and future of Philadelphia parks and architecture : Radio Times : Urban Planning : WHYY

The past, present, and future of Philadelphia parks and architecture


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Work continues at the Rail Park, Thursday June 7, 2018 in Philadelphia. The quarter-mile-long Rail Park is scheduled to open to visitors Thursday June 14, the first phase of a park that supporters hope will eventually span 3 miles through the center of Philadelphia via former Reading Railroad tunnels, rail cuts and elevated platforms. The end result would be about twice the length and width of New York's High Line.(AP Photo/Jacqueline Larma)
Work continues at the Rail Park, Thursday June 7, 2018 in Philadelphia. The quarter-mile-long Rail Park is scheduled to open to visitors Thursday June 14, the first phase of a park that supporters hope will eventually span 3 miles through the center of Philadelphia via former Reading Railroad tunnels, rail cuts and elevated platforms. The end result would be about twice the length and width of New York’s High Line.(AP Photo/Jacqueline Larma)

Guests: Kevin Dow, Inga Saffron, David Brownlee

Source: The past, present, and future of Philadelphia parks and architecture : Radio Times : Urban Planning : WHYY

Love on the Rail Park | Flickr

The Rail Park’s first quarter-mile section, which officially opens on June 14, follows the gentle curve of a former rail spur, rising from Noble Street just east of Broad to the middle of the 1100 block of Callowhill Street. Ultimately, the Rail Park is envisioned as a three-mile linear park that might someday connect 10 neighborhoods, from Poplar to Brewerytown. The first phase has cost about $11 million, and reuse of the rest of the elevated viaduct as a park easily could exceed $50 million.

— Ashley Hahn

PlanPhilly | In Common: Rail Park opens, carrying the freight of a changing neighborhood

Photo Credit: Neal Santos for PlanPhilly

What does it mean to create a new park in a changing, sometimes contested neighborhood? Next in our series about Philly’s changing public spaces,…

Read more: PlanPhilly | In Common: Rail Park opens, carrying the freight of a changing neighborhood

Second Chinatown Tower?

Only six months after the October groundbreaking for the new Chinatown Eastern Tower Community Center project ERASERHOOD has obtained a copy of the artist’s conception for a second tower in the Chinatown North neighborhood. Our source required complete anonymity before agreeing to meet with us. The image, labeled simply, “Callowhill Containment Facility #1,” depicts what looks like an extremely large building planned for a site in the vicinity of 10th and Carlton Streets. (If the scale of the illustration is accurate, this building would be even larger than the Terminal Commerce Building, former headquarters of the Reading Railroad, located at Broad and Callowhill Streets.)

When asked if this was planned as a residential development, our source paused for a moment before answering, “not exactly.” Further queries regarding the purpose of this strange looking building were ignored. The source did admit the document was obtained while serving as an intern for a large law-enforcement agency.

Before fleeing, the source mumbled something about a glass box and somebody named Judy, finishing our interview with the cryptic phrase, “Callowhill isn’t exactly Nightvale, but still…”

Gordon Cole could not be reached for comment.