Wes (@someguyinphilly) • Instagram photos and videos

Staring down at their phones for fear of talking to a neighbor, waiting for some stranger from Uber to take them anywhere else. That’s #callowhill . This used to be the playground of #artists and #freaks, now it’s #brunch and trikes and #yuppies who couldn’t tell you who #DavidLynch is, let alone how inspired he was by what this place used to be. Yesterday’s paint stained industrial loft is now just a real estate gimmick, “artist loft” just a marketing tool that means the place is big enough for suburban creature comforts. Walls once draped in original works in progress are now covered in mass produced cliches, “Live, Laugh, Love,” #blessed . Lynch once said of the neighborhood, “the fear, insanity, corruption, filth, despair, violence in the air was so beautiful to me.” That beauty’s long gone now, usurped by a neo-urban ideal and a different kind of despair, the desperation to be just like everything else #wheredidthefreaksallgo

A post shared by Wes (@someguyinphilly) on

Source: Wes (@someguyinphilly) • Instagram photos and videos

Michael Klusek (@phillyrevive) • Instagram photos and videos

Source: Michael Klusek (@phillyrevive) • Instagram photos and videos

13th and Wood | 13th and Wood, Callowhill, aka the Eraserhoo… | Dennis Coleman | Flickr

13th and Wood
13th and Wood, Callowhill, aka the Eraserhood. This is the specific corner that filmmaker David Lynch lived on while attending the Academy of Fine Arts. He wrote the infamous “Eraserhead” while living here.

Source: 13th and Wood | 13th and Wood, Callowhill, aka the Eraserhoo… | Dennis Coleman | Flickr

Liberty Rose (@libertyrosefromphilly) • Instagram photos and videos

See this Instagram photo by @libertyrosefromphilly • 82 likes

Source: Liberty Rose (@libertyrosefromphilly) • Instagram photos and videos

We never saw these patterned walkways outside the Philadelphia Museum of Art as possible inspirations for David Lynch until Rob Lybeck shared his own vision of them with us. (via Rob Lybeck Photography)

We never saw these patterned walkways outside the Philadelphia Museum of Art as possible inspirations for David Lynch until Rob Lybeck shared his own vision of them with us.

(via Rob Lybeck Photography)