Walking the Eraserhood: Broad and Green Streets

Panorama 1552_hdr_pregamma_1_reinhard05_brightness_-10_chromatic_adaptation_1_light_adaptation_0 small

Via Flickr:
“Walking the Eraserhood” represents an ongoing street-level exploration of the Callowhill district and surrounding environs, a sort of virtual walking tour of the neighborhood.

The vibrant, imposing temple owned by Congregation Rodeph Shalom dominates the east side of the street, here. Congregation Rodeph Shalom founded in 1795 is the oldest Ashkenazi congregation in the United States.

Copyright © 2009-2013, Bob Bruhin. All rights reserved.

Walking the Eraserhood: Broad Street and Ridge Avenue

Via Flickr:
“Walking the Eraserhood” represents an ongoing street-level exploration of the Callowhill district and surrounding environs, a sort of virtual walking tour of the neighborhood.

This corner represents the northernmost stretch of the Eraserhood. (While not technically part of the Callowhill Neighborhood, the wedge defined by Ridge Avenue, Broad Street, and Spring Garden Street, is considered part of the area covered by the Eraserhood blog.) Northeast is the striking, long abandoned Divine Lorraine Hotel, once a commercial hotel, then a church residence, finally an empty hulk. Many owners have attempted to restore this beautiful monster to former glory. As of this writing, none have succeeded. To the northwest, the former Northwestern National Bank/Broad Street Trust Company dominates the corner. Currently the site houses People Community Credit Union and a PNC Bank branch.

Copyright © 2009-2013, Bob Bruhin. All rights reserved.


View Walking the Eraserhood in a larger map

Walking the Eraserhood: Ridge Avenue and Mount Vernon Street

Via Flickr:
“Walking the Eraserhood” represents an ongoing street-level exploration of the Callowhill district and surrounding environs, a sort of virtual walking tour of the neighborhood.

On the southeast corner stands a reasonably well preserved example of a classic filling station from the early days of automobile travel. The northeast corner supports a former power station for mass transit, planned for adaptive reuse, which will include forty apartment units, twenty parking spaces for cars, and ten spots for bikes.

Copyright © 2009-2013, Bob Bruhin. All rights reserved.


View Walking the Eraserhood in a larger map

Walking the Eraserhood: Ridge Avenue and Clay Street

Via Flickr:
“Walking the Eraserhood” represents an ongoing street-level exploration of the Callowhill district and surrounding environs, a sort of virtual walking tour of the neighborhood.

The residential property on the northwest corner has been abandoned for many years, despite frequent plans to rehabilitate it. Somewhere in the history of the site, a fourth floor was demolished. Current plans are transform the 20K square foot building into 12 two-bedroom and four one-bedroom rental apartments. Looking northwest along Ridge, one can catch a first glimpse of the abandoned Divine Lorraine Hotel.

Copyright © 2009-2013, Bob Bruhin. All rights reserved.

View Walking the Eraserhood in a larger map

Walking the Eraserhood: 524 North 12th Street

Via Flickr:
“Walking the Eraserhood” represents an ongoing street-level exploration of the Callowhill district and surrounding environs, a sort of virtual walking tour of the neighborhood.

The amazing relic of Finney & Son Monuments/Mausoleum, on the east side of 12th Streetx now houses the Philadelphia Mausoleum of Contemporary Art (PhilaMOCA), an arts organization and performance venue famous for promoting the Eraserhood as a creepy yet inspirational neighborhood.

Copyright © 2009-2013, Bob Bruhin. All rights reserved.

View Walking the Eraserhood in a larger map

Walking the Eraserhood: 1121 Spring Garden Street

Via Flickr:
“Walking the Eraserhood” represents an ongoing street-level exploration of the Callowhill district and surrounding environs, a sort of virtual walking tour of the neighborhood.

With luck, the twin spires of the endangered Church of the Assumption are still here on the north side of the street. Tradition holds this is also the site over which Franklin’s kite flew during his famous electrical experiment. Just west of Assumption is a rectory, built in a radically different style.

Copyright © 2009-2013, Bob Bruhin. All rights reserved.


View Walking the Eraserhood in a larger map

Walking the Eraserhood: 1026 Spring Garden Street

Via Flickr:
“Walking the Eraserhood” represents an ongoing street-level exploration of the Callowhill district and surrounding environs, a sort of virtual walking tour of the neighborhood.

The 1889 Spring Garden Farmers Market occupies the south side of the street, here. The market has been closed for decades, but the building has been kept in relatively good repair by a series of other businesses. Currently it is occupied by a music venue known as Union Transfer.

Copyright © 2009-2013, Bob Bruhin. All rights reserved.


View Walking the Eraserhood in a larger map

Walking the Eraserhood: 11th and Green Streets

“Walking the Eraserhood” represents an ongoing street-level exploration of the Callowhill district and surrounding environs, a sort of virtual walking tour of the neighborhood.

See the small row of homes on the southeast corner, tucked in to the fold of the former Independence Press building.

Copyright © 2009-2013, Bob Bruhin. All rights reserved.


View Walking the Eraserhood in a larger map

Walking the Eraserhood: 9th and Green Streets

“Walking the Eraserhood” represents an ongoing street-level exploration of the Callowhill district and surrounding environs, a sort of virtual walking tour of the neighborhood.

Here you can look north to see the last block of the abandoned portion of the Reading Viaduct west of you, and the bed of the current SEPTA rails to the east as they leave the Commuter Tunnel and rejoin the still active portion of the former Reading line.

Copyright © 2009-2013, Bob Bruhin. All rights reserved.


View Walking the Eraserhood in a larger map

Walking the Eraserhood: 9th and Spring Garden Streets

“Walking the Eraserhood” represents an ongoing street-level exploration of the Callowhill district and surrounding environs, a sort of virtual walking tour of the neighborhood.

The Viaduct crosses Spring Garden Street to the west of this intersection, on an uncharacteristic concrete bridge. The northwest corner of the intersection is dominated by former Spring Garden Station, closed when the Viaduct was abandoned in favor of the new underground Commuter Tunnel.

Copyright © 2009-2013, Bob Bruhin. All rights reserved.


View Walking the Eraserhood in a larger map